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Anna dressed in overdramatic nonsense.

January 24, 2013 Leave a comment

From the NLS annotation:

Anna Dressed in Blood

Anna Dressed in Blood

Since his father’s untimely death, seventeen-year-old Cas and his Wiccan mom have continued the family trade–hunting down vengeful, murdering spirits. But when Cas goes after ghostly Anna, an unexpected occurrence changes everything. Violence and some strong language. For senior high and older readers. 2011.

Let me guess…it’s LOVE isn’t it?  The unexpected occurrence is that Cas has feelings for “ghostly” Anna.  Is she GHOST-ly, I mean, is she sort of like a ghost, or is she an actual ghost?  Wait wait don’t tell me. I’m sure that I’d rather be shocked when it’s all revealed 30 pages in to the 320 page book.

You know, if I were a teenager I would be super pissed that YA classified books almost exclusively have to do with either the supernatural or falling in love–typically both. I know the whys and the wherefores to writing supernatural for young adults; spare me the lecture.  I’m just saying that as a reader of books and a librarian, I’m just wondering if somewhere teens are getting burned out on being constantly bombarded with the SSDD (same shit…).

Anyway, today’s offering is called Anna Dressed in Blood and it is the first book in the…wait for it…ANNA series by Kendare Blake.  Yes, Kendare Blake.  Let’s all make a little offering to the Goddess in hopes that Kendare is her pen-name.  And “Blake?”  Please.  We get it, you’re material pays homage to both the Gothic and the Romantic periods.

The Tale of Halcyon Crap

November 14, 2011 Leave a comment

The Tale of Halcyon CraneSorry Reader,  I know it’s been a long time.  I’d like to say that my absence from this blog has been due entirely to the fact that I haven’t stumbled upon any poopy books.  Alas, that isn’t exactly true.  I can admit to you, my friend, that although I’ve been cataloging like crazy for the last three months, I haven’t been paying much attention to the individual books’ contents.  Does this mean that I’ve been a bad cataloguer?  I can’t answer that.  I will tell you though, that I’ve been reading a shit ton of books since August…which enhances my qualifications, not only as a cataloger, but also as a judge-er of books.

This week’s submission is called The Tale of Halcyon Crane.  I have both cataloged this turd and read it cover to cover.  And here is what I have to say: what a waste of time.  This book is 328 pages in print, and 9 hours, 52 minutes in audio.  This book should have been about 1 hour, 30 minutes, or a whole lot less pages.

From the NLS annotation:

Journalist Hallie James learns the mother she thought had died thirty years ago was, until recently, alive–and a famous photographer. Hallie travels to remote Grand Manitou Island on the Great Lakes to seek the truth but instead encounters hostile locals and ancestral ghosts in her childhood home. 2010.

The NLS annotation doesn’t give any indication of what a fart bag waste of time this book will be.  Basically, this person (being a journalist really doesn’t come into play much at all in the book so don’t worry about that detail) Hallie James has lived in Washington since her mother died in a fire when Hallie was 5 years old.  Since that time, Hallie lived with, and later near, her father, who was an important, and well renowned educator in, I want to say…mathematics?  Changed people’s lives, stand and deliver, etc. etc., you get the picture.

Anyway, one day Hallie gets a letter from her “dead” mother.  The woman has tracked her down and is telling her, by letter, that she is her mother and invites her to come to Grand Manitou Island.  Unfortunately, the woman died before the letter was recieved by Hallie.  Hallie asks her father about her “dead” mother, and then later that night, he suffers a heart attack, or stroke, or something and also dies.

Hallie jets off to Grand Manitou Island to GET TO THE BOTTOM OF THINGS.  Without telling any of the locals (and she talks to a lot of them) that the famous photographer woman claimed to be her mother, she learns that the woman had a daughter named Halcyon who drowned, with her father, about 30 years ago.  She hears this alot.  From all the locals she talks to.  And yet…

And yet it takes this moron nearly half of the book to realize that Hallie MIGHT, just might, be short for Halcyon.  Ohmygod, she’s the girl who was thought to be dead!!  Just like her [now] dead mother is the woman whom Hallie thought to be dead for all of these years.  Is this supposed to be a mystery because it just seems like patronizing poopcakes.

There’s a ghostly family history that and elderly family servant shares with Hallie/Halcyon that explains…over the course of a few weeks (or days)…how the family got to the events of the death-by-fire, drowned-in-the-lake misunderstanding.

It never occurs to Hallie that the old woman can’t possibly know all of the intimate details of the people who’s stories she is relating to Hallie.  I mean, if this idiot is really a journalist, shouldn’t she start having SOME doubts about point of view and narrator?  The woman is telling the story in a first person omniscient sort of way and you’re not a little curious about how she knows all of this?  It also never dawns on Hallie that this old lady is only seen by Hallie and NOBODY else? [SPOILER ALERT (highlight to view): the old lady is the ghost of a witch.]

And that brings me to my usual, willing-suspension-of-disbelief, gripe.  Hallie’s dad faked their death, the mother had been looking for her for years because she didn’t believe that her daughter was really dead, and yet NEVER found her?  The father didn’t exactly “go underground.”  Later you find out that he had an accomplice, and it becomes even more far fetched that this accomplice woman stayed quiet–and stayed on Grand Manitou without spilling the beans–for 30 years.  Even after she gave birth to the man’s illegitimate son and raised him as a single mother.  Please…it’s Grand Manitou…not outer Mongolia…where even THEY have heard of child support.

Anyway, the ghost story part of this book is solid.  Unfortunately, it’s wrapped in wadded up soiled toilet paper masquerading as a “novel” and should be avoided at all costs.